SELinux – the good

There is brief intro presentation on SELinux for “everyday” users. The 12th slides is titled “SELinux – the good”. It has quoted someone by the name Larry Loeb:

“Let me assure you that this action by the NSA was the crypto-equivalent of the Pope coming down off the balcony in Rome, working the crowd with a few loaves of bread and some fish, and then inviting everyone to come over to his place to watch the soccer game and have a few beers. There are some things that one just never expects to see, and the NSA handing out source code along with details of the security mechanism behind it was right up there on that list.”

I just found that hilarious so I had to pass it on.

I had been disabling SELinux, since it was released in FC2, but as of Fedora 9 I leave it on. For the most part now, it operates pretty transparently.

(Presentation link via James Morris)

Google Chrome on Fedora

Try out Chromium. Courtesy of T ‘spot’ Callaway:

Using your favorite text editor (as root), create chromium.repo in /etc/yum.repos.d/, with the following contents:

name=Chromium Test Packages

Then run (as root):

# yum install chromium

From spot’s blog:

The packages are i386/i586 only (and the i586 chromium is a bit of a lie, it isn’t compiled with the correct optflags yet) because chromium depends on v8, which doesn’t work on 64bit anything (yet). Also, plugins don’t work at the moment and some of the tab functionality doesn’t work right, but as a general web browser, it seems functional enough. (And, it seems to pass the Acid3 test, which isn’t surprising at all, since WebKit does and Chrome uses WebKit.)

Looks interesting!

64-bit Linux

There was some discussion on the fedora-devel list about changing the default architecture for 32-bit Fedora. Which would mean that users running 32-bit Fedora with modern CPU’s will see some improvement, while older hardware will need to be supported by some secondary means or not at all.

There are some good points in the thread, but the question I found myself asking was: “Why do I still run 32-bit Linux at all?”. For 3 years, all of my computers have been 64-bit hardware.

I thought it was the web, however …

  • Flash: Runs great using 32-bit software in 64-bit Fedora (the native 64-bit plugin is currently in beta).
  • Java: OpenJDK has had a native 64-bit browser plugin for Java for over a year (the official native 64-bit plugin for Sun Java was released almost 6 months ago) .
  • I don’t even use things like RealPlayer anymore, and most websites no longer bother to embed video directly.

I often would recommend to people that multimedia had limitations or would require work in 64-bit Linux, but all my DVD’s, music and collected media work perfectly fine! And if you’ve looked at tutorials for media playback, there is little or no difference in the work required. (FYI: I have not missed anything for NOT having the win32 binary dll’s).

The only insignificant difference is the (sometimes) 10-15% size increase in downloads and applications for using 64-bit software. However for the performance gain, the cost in hard disk or download time is well worth it.

I feel silly for installing CentOS 32-bit on my personal server last year. That is not even used for multimedia or web. I think may upgrade it.

I admit I’ve been a luddite for far too long. If your hardware supports it (almost no new hardware is pure 32bit), then you should be using 64-bit Linux. In your next update or install cycle, skip the i386 and go download the X86_64!

Fedora 11 Released

“This is Fedora!”. Leonidas is in command!

After a minor 2 week delay, the diligent Fedora project just announced the release of Fedora 11.

The Fedora 11 Feature List seems rather spectacular with many big (and small) inclusions. There really are too many updates to list, some of the the highlights:


  • GNOME 2.26 – Disk burning, Simpler file sharing, Better volume control, Media player enhancements
  • KDE 4.2.2 – more updates to KDE4
  • XFCE 4.6
  • Better font installer
  • Faster startup (20 seconds to get to Gnome)


  • DeltaRPM support – faster, smaller downloads for updates
  • Bluetooth Improvements
  • Default EXT4 Filesystem
  • Nouveau Driver as Default for Nvidia Video Cards


  • Firefox 3.5(beta) – HTML5 and native video support
  • Thunderbird 3.0
  • Kernel 2.6.29
  • Netbeans 6.5 – popular IDE (alternative to Eclipse)
  • X-Server 1.6

You can download Fedora 11 using the standard mirrors or using the Torrent (recommended).

Please user the Fedora-List mailing list or any of the forums for help. I have published my Personal Fedora 11 Installation Guide which is quite similar to Fedora 10 (but with less issues)!

If you try Fedora 11, on the surface you may not notice how many major and minor improvements have been worked into this release. Download, install and explore and I’m sure you will realize the positive changes in this rapidly moving distribution.

Mailing List Permalinks

Currently I am subscribed to 19 mailing lists and there are a handful more that I plan on joining (when I get around to it). The benefits of a mailing list (especially in the Linux world) is the massive amount of useful information that is often shared by developers and experienced users that may not be found elsewhere (assuming you ignore the useless discussions).

I often link to web page posts to mailing lists on this site. For example, anything posted to the fedora-list can be seen at the fedora-list Archives. Or if you have ever read Fedora News this is done a lot!

What I would really like is for a quick method to get from the email in my mail client to the email’s URL at the given mailing list archive. I think of this as some sort of “mailing list permalink”. Since not everyone signs up for mailing lists, I want a quicker way of sharing useful information sometimes buried in the archives.

With the number of mailing lists I use, the only practical mail client is Google’s Gmail, and of course I pretty much only use Mozilla Firefox. So I imagine a Firefox Extension and/or a Grease Monkey script could insert a link into each Gmail message, or perhaps a “Right-Click > Search for this email at the archives” option on the context menu? … Alternatively, I would even consider switching to a desktop email client (Mozilla Thunderbird is really the only choice) if I could install some sort of plugin/extension to do the same thing.

Has anyone ever considered this? Does some combination of software achieve this? I welcome any ideas or suggestions on how to do this. I plan to investigate this further and maybe even start up my own project if I get some time.


I finally got around to signing up with the microblogging site Apparently it’s where the true geeks are! I used the handle mjmwired to make this more specific to my site and technical stuff. For the time being, unless I know someone, I am subscribing only to Linux and Fedora related people and groups. I hope to change that.

I am currently following a group of Fedora developers and contributors that have participated in mailing lists or have a blog, etc. Most are above my league, but my intention is only to silently listen to the traffic there.

If you’re on let me know and I’ll subscribe to anyone who visits my site, reads my blog, has sent me an email or wants to communicate. I honestly would like to better connect with my readers. I’m hoping this will be fun and interesting!

* As always if you want to send me any message, I appreciate any and all comments through my standard contact form.