Download Older Versions of Fedora

A frequently asked question is: Where can I find a specific older version of Fedora? The correct answer is: If you CANNOT find it on the official Fedora Mirror List, then chances are it is too old and not supported.

Unless you need an older version for some very specific task, I strongly recommend that you use a recent version of Fedora.

To find an older version, start by going through the mirrors to see if you can find a site that is physically closer to you (for faster downloads). If you cannot find the version on a mirror, try downloading from Redhat’s site (below).

Some things to note:

  • If a DVD image is not available try to generate your own DVD from CD’s.
  • The SRPM ISO images are for source code and not useful for running and/or installing.
  • The follow links could be removed at any point in the future.
  • The rescue-CD is not needed for installing/running but maybe helpful to boot or fix an existing installation.
  • Since you need to download each ISO individually, make sure to verify the MD5SUM or SHA1SUM.

Download Links:

Fedora Version Architecture Install CD’s Rescue-CD DVD
Fedora Core 1 i386 3
x86_64 3
Fedora Core 2 i386 4 yes yes
x86_64 4 yes
Fedora Core 3 i386 4 yes yes
x86_64 4 yes
Fedora Core 4 i386 4 yes yes
x86_64 5 yes yes
ppc 5 yes
Fedora Core 5 i386 5 yes yes
x86_64 5 yes yes
ppc 5 yes yes
Fedora Core 6 i386 5 yes yes
x86_64 6 yes yes
ppc 6 yes yes

Fedora 7 and newer no longer use “Core” as part of the release name.

Fedora Version Architecture Media Type
Fedora 7 i386 DVD + Rescue CD
i386 Live CD
x86_64 DVD + Rescue CD
x86_64 Live DVD
ppc DVD + Rescue CD
Fedora 8 i386 DVD + Rescue CD
i686 Live CD
x86_64 DVD + Rescue CD
x86_64 Live DVD
ppc DVD + Rescue CD
ppc Live CD
Fedora 9 i386 DVD, 6-CD Set
i686 Live CDs (Gnome, KDE)
x86_64 DVD, 7-CD Set
x86_64 Live CDs (Gnome, KDE)
ppc DVD, 7-CD Set
Fedora 10 i386 DVD, 6-CD Set
i686 Live CDs (Gnome, KDE)
x86_64 DVD, 6-CD Set
x86_64 Live CDs (Gnome, KDE)
ppc DVD, 7-CD Set
Fedora 11 i386 DVD, 6-CD Set
i686 Live CDs (Gnome, KDE)
x86_64 DVD, 6-CD Set
x86_64 Live CDs (Gnome, KDE)
ppc DVD, 7-CD Set
Fedora 12 i386 DVD, 5-CD Set
i686 Live CDs (Gnome, KDE)
x86_64 DVD, 5-CD Set
x86_64 Live CDs (Gnome, KDE)
ppc DVD, 6-CD Set
Fedora 13 i386 DVD, 5-CD Set
i686 Live CDs (Gnome, KDE)
x86_64 DVD, 5-CD Set
x86_64 Live CDs (Gnome, KDE)
Fedora 14 i386 DVD, 5-CD Set
i686 Live CDs (Gnome, KDE)
x86_64 DVD, 5-CD Set
x86_64 Live CDs (Gnome, KDE)

Related:
Fedora Public Mirror List
How to download Fedora

Older versions of CentOS can be found here: http://vault.centos.org/

UPDATE: 10/04/2008 – Updated all links to archives.fedoraproject.org
UPDATE: 03/31/2009 – Updated for Fedora 7 and later. No installation CD sets are available.
UPDATE: 02/22/2010 – Added Fedora 9 and 10.
UPDATE: 03/23/2012 – Added Fedora 11-14.

PHP4 on Fedora Core 5

Apparently some developers still require PHP4 on their web servers. The previous method for doing so on Fedora Core 4 (FC4) was to use the FC3 RPM’s. (A formal procedure was provided by the guide: PHP4 on FC4.)

Since the release of FC5, the dependancies and outdated linking from the FC3 RPM packages may be difficult to resolve. It is recommended to recompile the PHP4 SRC.RPM and link it to the running software provided in FC5. However, there are some needed changes to the SRC.RPM. There is a modified source RPM package provided on the following guide:

PHP4 on Fedora Core

Steps provided should work for FC5 as well as FC4. There are some precompiled binary RPM’s provided as well.

These have only been tested by myself. I would appreciate it if anyone can report as to how well these work!

Yahoo Launch on Firefox in Fedora

Fedora users can access full Launch.Yahoo music videos with Firefox. The basic trick is to use the GreaseMonkey Firefox Extension and making use of MPlayer and it’s browser plugin and encoder system.

Watching Streaming Music Videos

1. First make sure you have MPlayer installed in your Fedora and the mplayerplugin-in working correctly. You can check by going to: about:plugins in Firefox.

2. Install the GreaseMonkey Firefox Extension.
If you are using Firefox 1.0.x, install version 0.5.3.
If you are using Firefox 1.5.x, install version 0.6.4.
Once installed, the GreaseMonkey icon will appear in the bottom right of the FireFox window.

3. Install pkLaunch.
To install Right-Click over “Open pklaunch-0.8.user.js”, and select Install User Script….
A window will open showing pkLaunch and that “launch.yahoo” and “music.yahoo” have both been added as “Included pages” for this script.

4. Click on any music video at Yahoo Music.
A window will open titled “data: – Yahoo Music”.

Done!

Saving Music Videos to Disk

The following works with some degree of success. Since you are streaming, the quality may not be perfect or there may be some “hiccups”.

1. As stated above, make sure you have MPlayer installed, as well as MEncoder. MEncoder is extra component in the MPlayer package that allows you to convert audio and video.

2. In Step #4 above, when the video window opens, Right-Click in the video and select Copy URL.

3. Open a command terminal with a Paste option. I recommend either gnome-terminal in Gnome or konsole in KDE.
(Note: if you prefer xterm you need to paste to a text editor first and highlight before continuing.)

4. In the command terminal window enter the following but do NOT hit [Enter]:

mencoder -ovc copy -oac copy -o myvideo.wmv “

Note: the the ending quotes. Then paste the text copied in Step #2. It will be long! After pasting, close the command with a set of quotes: ” … and hit [Enter].

This will copy the data from the server. Since it is streaming, it will take at least as long as it takes to view the content (> 3Min).

When done, you should be able to play the video file in MPlayer. I do not know if the file will be viewable in Windows.

Tested Versions:
FF 1.0.4, FF 1.0.7, GM 0.5.3, MPlayer 1.0pre7, mplayerplug-in 3.14
Should work with FF 1.5, but I haven’t tested it yet.

CentOS 4.1 Quick Examination

Since Redhat stopped supporting their commercially available Linux distribution, they moved to an Enterprise Linux Server (RHEL) and left everyone else to use a community effort (Fedora Core). Considering the cost of RHEL, the source packages were recompiled and redistributed. The resulting CentOS is a free binary compatible distribution of RHEL without the proprietary Redhat only software. I have seen some virtual private servers using CentOS for the virtualized operating system.

I installed the DVD based copy of CentOS 4.1 on my main desktop a few weeks ago just to experiment. For the most part it, it installs and is setup very similarly to Fedora Core 3(?). Upon initial inspection it also seems to come with the similar list of software. However the major issue here is that it is geared for server performance. Hence, it will not include the latest versions of most software and instead use widely supported and stable applications (i.e. PHP4 as opposed to PHP5, etc.). I could tell that the desktop applications were a bit out of date, but that makes sense considering its intended purpose. … After having used Fedora Core 4 for the past four months, I was shocked at the performance of CentOS. CentOS seemed significantly faster han FC4. In terms of user interface, web browsing, launching applications and even running servers and daemons – it was very notable. I do not know if it has to do with the GCC4 being used in FC4, but I’m still surprised to realize this now. Anyways, I decided I could not use it for desktop purposes since much of the software was older and there was not as much support from the community in general.

I played around configuring different installs of Apache, MySQL and PHP. I tried recompiling source RPMs (SRC.RPM) from FC4, but it became tricky to have multiple versions running. I will try again from source files instead.

My opinion so far is that it is a VERY stable and usable server distribution. If the software it included was newer I would probably be using it as my main Linux desktop. Anyways, more later as I learn more.

PHP4 RPMs for Fedora Core 4

EDIT (Dec 19, 2005):
I have written a formal guide on PHP4 on FC4.

As a followup to my previous post about PHP4 on FC4, I decided to abandon PHP5 altogether. I spent some time to try and get the PHP4 src.rpm from FC3 to compile correctly in FC4. As it turned out neither the GCC4 nor the GCC3.2 included in FC4 would compile everything properly. So I decided to try GCC3.4 (which I installed from source long ago when first tweaking with FC4).

Anyways it worked. I have 15 RPM files which I don’t think I will upload unless someone really cares for them. I’ve only done this in the process of seeing if there is an advantage in using my own compiled RPM’s as opposed to using the FC3 RPM’s. Right now I don’t think that there is.

Recommended Method:
In the end if you force uninstall all PHP5 RPM files in FC4, and then you install the FC3 PHP4 RPM’s, it does work.

[root]# rpm -e php-imap php-ldap php-mysql php-pear php

Install any PHP4 RPM you want from Fedora Core 3 Updates. Make sure to install the php and php-pear RPM files together.

MPlayer from CVS in FC4

I’ve been following along with the improvements made by the MPlayer development team through their mailing list. When Fedora Core 4 came out there were some (I think many) issues with the choice to use GCC4 (the GNU Compiler). Many applications, such as MPlayer, were not yet supported. There were patches from other groups, but the MPlayer team did not officially support it. As usual I compiled from source, but I used GCC3.2. I’ve never had any problems.

A week ago I pulled a CVS snapshot through their website and decided to compile and test a developmental version to see anything new. I installed along side my current version of MPlayer v1.0pre7. (I used ----prefix=/opt/mplayercvs/ during the configure step.) It all seemed to work perfectly with GCC4. Some basic things I noticed were better support for some media formats and full support for many output plugins that didn’t work with the GCC3.2 workaround. Finally they also have ported the GUI to GTK2. The forever old (and still very poor) gui was using GTK1.2 and has now been deprecated. Although I don’t see any new features in the GUI, it is nice to finally have a consistent GTK/Gnome interface – fonts, themes and all.

Basically good progress, but not recommended for average users. I am looking forward to the new release, even though lately it seems Xine has seemed like a better alternative.

PHP4 on Fedora Core 4

EDIT (Dec 19, 2005):
I have written a formal guide on PHP4 on FC4.

One of my biggest difficulties with using Fedora Core 4 was that it packages PHP5 with the Apache webserver. Any experienced person should know that Fedora Core is probably a terrible Linux Distribution to be using for a large scale Web Server on the Public Internet. However, it may be sufficient for home or Intranet usage.

What I like to do is, I mirror my public main site mjm wired on my home Linux computer. This was very easy with FC1 – FC3, however PHP5 broke several things in my PHP code. I tried fixing most of them, but it wasn’t worth the effort since my current hosting provider is still on PHP v4.3.10. Anyways, I tried meddling with the PHP4 RPM in FC3 – that was no good. Then I tried recompiling the source RPM for FC3 (src.rpm), but that caused too many compiler errors and with over 60 lines of configure options to compile I couldn’t figure out all the dependancies and flags to satisfy the compile. I had some problems with some XML libraries.

In the end I just compiled the tar.bz2 with some minimal settings. I set the install directory to use /opt/php4 so as not to disturb PHP5. It properly installs the PHP4 Apache Module in the correct location. Then I had to edit /etc/httpd/conf.d/php.conf to disable PHP5 and enable PHP4. So now Apache2 on FC4 runs PHP4 correctly for me. I know there is some way to run them in parallel with controlling certain directories and controlling certain Types (.php, .php4, .php5), but I don’t require this at the moment.

I might write a formal process on this later when I get the time. However, I do think that there MUST be a better way to do this, I am open to suggestion or tips.

Toying with Kernel 2.6.13

Since the 2.6.13 kernel was released some time ago, I’ve heard plenty of negative commentary about changes within it. From referring to the Fedora-list mailing list, it appears as though there were plenty of rough edges. Anyways, using my FC4 Kernel Notes, I followed through my procedure and installed version 2.6.13.2 from source.

The first observation I noticed was that it didn’t seem much different from my last 2.6.12 kernel or my last 2.6.11 FC4 kernel. The only major thing was that my ACPI was broken for S3. I can enter Suspend to RAM (STR) but it won’t resume properly. Normally on previous 2.6.9 and previous kernels, the OS would resume, but I lost input, screen, mouse or some other hardware. In this case not even the PowerButton works correctly. I need some more experimentation here.