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Based on kernel version 3.19. Page generated on 2015-02-13 21:16 EST.

1	What:		/sys/bus/pci/drivers/.../bind
2	Date:		December 2003
3	Contact:	linux-pci@vger.kernel.org
4	Description:
5			Writing a device location to this file will cause
6			the driver to attempt to bind to the device found at
7			this location.	This is useful for overriding default
8			bindings.  The format for the location is: DDDD:BB:DD.F.
9			That is Domain:Bus:Device.Function and is the same as
10			found in /sys/bus/pci/devices/.  For example:
11			# echo 0000:00:19.0 > /sys/bus/pci/drivers/foo/bind
12			(Note: kernels before 2.6.28 may require echo -n).
13	
14	What:		/sys/bus/pci/drivers/.../unbind
15	Date:		December 2003
16	Contact:	linux-pci@vger.kernel.org
17	Description:
18			Writing a device location to this file will cause the
19			driver to attempt to unbind from the device found at
20			this location.	This may be useful when overriding default
21			bindings.  The format for the location is: DDDD:BB:DD.F.
22			That is Domain:Bus:Device.Function and is the same as
23			found in /sys/bus/pci/devices/. For example:
24			# echo 0000:00:19.0 > /sys/bus/pci/drivers/foo/unbind
25			(Note: kernels before 2.6.28 may require echo -n).
26	
27	What:		/sys/bus/pci/drivers/.../new_id
28	Date:		December 2003
29	Contact:	linux-pci@vger.kernel.org
30	Description:
31			Writing a device ID to this file will attempt to
32			dynamically add a new device ID to a PCI device driver.
33			This may allow the driver to support more hardware than
34			was included in the driver's static device ID support
35			table at compile time.  The format for the device ID is:
36			VVVV DDDD SVVV SDDD CCCC MMMM PPPP.  That is Vendor ID,
37			Device ID, Subsystem Vendor ID, Subsystem Device ID,
38			Class, Class Mask, and Private Driver Data.  The Vendor ID
39			and Device ID fields are required, the rest are optional.
40			Upon successfully adding an ID, the driver will probe
41			for the device and attempt to bind to it.  For example:
42			# echo "8086 10f5" > /sys/bus/pci/drivers/foo/new_id
43	
44	What:		/sys/bus/pci/drivers/.../remove_id
45	Date:		February 2009
46	Contact:	Chris Wright <chrisw@sous-sol.org>
47	Description:
48			Writing a device ID to this file will remove an ID
49			that was dynamically added via the new_id sysfs entry.
50			The format for the device ID is:
51			VVVV DDDD SVVV SDDD CCCC MMMM.	That is Vendor ID, Device
52			ID, Subsystem Vendor ID, Subsystem Device ID, Class,
53			and Class Mask.  The Vendor ID and Device ID fields are
54			required, the rest are optional.  After successfully
55			removing an ID, the driver will no longer support the
56			device.  This is useful to ensure auto probing won't
57			match the driver to the device.  For example:
58			# echo "8086 10f5" > /sys/bus/pci/drivers/foo/remove_id
59	
60	What:		/sys/bus/pci/rescan
61	Date:		January 2009
62	Contact:	Linux PCI developers <linux-pci@vger.kernel.org>
63	Description:
64			Writing a non-zero value to this attribute will
65			force a rescan of all PCI buses in the system, and
66			re-discover previously removed devices.
67	
68	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../msi_bus
69	Date:		September 2014
70	Contact:	Linux PCI developers <linux-pci@vger.kernel.org>
71	Description:
72			Writing a zero value to this attribute disallows MSI and
73			MSI-X for any future drivers of the device.  If the device
74			is a bridge, MSI and MSI-X will be disallowed for future
75			drivers of all child devices under the bridge.  Drivers
76			must be reloaded for the new setting to take effect.
77	
78	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../msi_irqs/
79	Date:		September, 2011
80	Contact:	Neil Horman <nhorman@tuxdriver.com>
81	Description:
82			The /sys/devices/.../msi_irqs directory contains a variable set
83			of files, with each file being named after a corresponding msi
84			irq vector allocated to that device.
85	
86	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../msi_irqs/<N>
87	Date:		September 2011
88	Contact:	Neil Horman <nhorman@tuxdriver.com>
89	Description:
90			This attribute indicates the mode that the irq vector named by
91			the file is in (msi vs. msix)
92	
93	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../remove
94	Date:		January 2009
95	Contact:	Linux PCI developers <linux-pci@vger.kernel.org>
96	Description:
97			Writing a non-zero value to this attribute will
98			hot-remove the PCI device and any of its children.
99	
100	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../pci_bus/.../rescan
101	Date:		May 2011
102	Contact:	Linux PCI developers <linux-pci@vger.kernel.org>
103	Description:
104			Writing a non-zero value to this attribute will
105			force a rescan of the bus and all child buses,
106			and re-discover devices removed earlier from this
107			part of the device tree.
108	
109	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../rescan
110	Date:		January 2009
111	Contact:	Linux PCI developers <linux-pci@vger.kernel.org>
112	Description:
113			Writing a non-zero value to this attribute will
114			force a rescan of the device's parent bus and all
115			child buses, and re-discover devices removed earlier
116			from this part of the device tree.
117	
118	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../reset
119	Date:		July 2009
120	Contact:	Michael S. Tsirkin <mst@redhat.com>
121	Description:
122			Some devices allow an individual function to be reset
123			without affecting other functions in the same device.
124			For devices that have this support, a file named reset
125			will be present in sysfs.  Writing 1 to this file
126			will perform reset.
127	
128	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../vpd
129	Date:		February 2008
130	Contact:	Ben Hutchings <bwh@kernel.org>
131	Description:
132			A file named vpd in a device directory will be a
133			binary file containing the Vital Product Data for the
134			device.  It should follow the VPD format defined in
135			PCI Specification 2.1 or 2.2, but users should consider
136			that some devices may have malformatted data.  If the
137			underlying VPD has a writable section then the
138			corresponding section of this file will be writable.
139	
140	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../virtfnN
141	Date:		March 2009
142	Contact:	Yu Zhao <yu.zhao@intel.com>
143	Description:
144			This symbolic link appears when hardware supports the SR-IOV
145			capability and the Physical Function driver has enabled it.
146			The symbolic link points to the PCI device sysfs entry of the
147			Virtual Function whose index is N (0...MaxVFs-1).
148	
149	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../dep_link
150	Date:		March 2009
151	Contact:	Yu Zhao <yu.zhao@intel.com>
152	Description:
153			This symbolic link appears when hardware supports the SR-IOV
154			capability and the Physical Function driver has enabled it,
155			and this device has vendor specific dependencies with others.
156			The symbolic link points to the PCI device sysfs entry of
157			Physical Function this device depends on.
158	
159	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../physfn
160	Date:		March 2009
161	Contact:	Yu Zhao <yu.zhao@intel.com>
162	Description:
163			This symbolic link appears when a device is a Virtual Function.
164			The symbolic link points to the PCI device sysfs entry of the
165			Physical Function this device associates with.
166	
167	What:		/sys/bus/pci/slots/.../module
168	Date:		June 2009
169	Contact:	linux-pci@vger.kernel.org
170	Description:
171			This symbolic link points to the PCI hotplug controller driver
172			module that manages the hotplug slot.
173	
174	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../label
175	Date:		July 2010
176	Contact:	Narendra K <narendra_k@dell.com>, linux-bugs@dell.com
177	Description:
178			Reading this attribute will provide the firmware
179			given name (SMBIOS type 41 string or ACPI _DSM string) of
180			the PCI device.	The attribute will be created only
181			if the firmware	has given a name to the PCI device.
182			ACPI _DSM string name will be given priority if the
183			system firmware provides SMBIOS type 41 string also.
184	Users:
185			Userspace applications interested in knowing the
186			firmware assigned name of the PCI device.
187	
188	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../index
189	Date:		July 2010
190	Contact:	Narendra K <narendra_k@dell.com>, linux-bugs@dell.com
191	Description:
192			Reading this attribute will provide the firmware
193			given instance (SMBIOS type 41 device type instance) of the
194			PCI device. The attribute will be created only if the firmware
195			has given an instance number to the PCI device.
196	Users:
197			Userspace applications interested in knowing the
198			firmware assigned device type instance of the PCI
199			device that can help in understanding the firmware
200			intended order of the PCI device.
201	
202	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../acpi_index
203	Date:		July 2010
204	Contact:	Narendra K <narendra_k@dell.com>, linux-bugs@dell.com
205	Description:
206			Reading this attribute will provide the firmware
207			given instance (ACPI _DSM instance number) of the PCI device.
208			The attribute will be created only if the firmware has given
209			an instance number to the PCI device. ACPI _DSM instance number
210			will be given priority if the system firmware provides SMBIOS
211			type 41 device type instance also.
212	Users:
213			Userspace applications interested in knowing the
214			firmware assigned instance number of the PCI
215			device that can help in understanding the firmware
216			intended order of the PCI device.
217	
218	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../d3cold_allowed
219	Date:		July 2012
220	Contact:	Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
221	Description:
222			d3cold_allowed is bit to control whether the corresponding PCI
223			device can be put into D3Cold state.  If it is cleared, the
224			device will never be put into D3Cold state.  If it is set, the
225			device may be put into D3Cold state if other requirements are
226			satisfied too.  Reading this attribute will show the current
227			value of d3cold_allowed bit.  Writing this attribute will set
228			the value of d3cold_allowed bit.
229	
230	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../sriov_totalvfs
231	Date:		November 2012
232	Contact:	Donald Dutile <ddutile@redhat.com>
233	Description:
234			This file appears when a physical PCIe device supports SR-IOV.
235			Userspace applications can read this file to determine the
236			maximum number of Virtual Functions (VFs) a PCIe physical
237			function (PF) can support. Typically, this is the value reported
238			in the PF's SR-IOV extended capability structure's TotalVFs
239			element.  Drivers have the ability at probe time to reduce the
240			value read from this file via the pci_sriov_set_totalvfs()
241			function.
242	
243	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../sriov_numvfs
244	Date:		November 2012
245	Contact:	Donald Dutile <ddutile@redhat.com>
246	Description:
247			This file appears when a physical PCIe device supports SR-IOV.
248			Userspace applications can read and write to this file to
249			determine and control the enablement or disablement of Virtual
250			Functions (VFs) on the physical function (PF). A read of this
251			file will return the number of VFs that are enabled on this PF.
252			A number written to this file will enable the specified
253			number of VFs. A userspace application would typically read the
254			file and check that the value is zero, and then write the number
255			of VFs that should be enabled on the PF; the value written
256			should be less than or equal to the value in the sriov_totalvfs
257			file. A userspace application wanting to disable the VFs would
258			write a zero to this file. The core ensures that valid values
259			are written to this file, and returns errors when values are not
260			valid.  For example, writing a 2 to this file when sriov_numvfs
261			is not 0 and not 2 already will return an error. Writing a 10
262			when the value of sriov_totalvfs is 8 will return an error.
263	
264	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../driver_override
265	Date:		April 2014
266	Contact:	Alex Williamson <alex.williamson@redhat.com>
267	Description:
268			This file allows the driver for a device to be specified which
269			will override standard static and dynamic ID matching.  When
270			specified, only a driver with a name matching the value written
271			to driver_override will have an opportunity to bind to the
272			device.  The override is specified by writing a string to the
273			driver_override file (echo pci-stub > driver_override) and
274			may be cleared with an empty string (echo > driver_override).
275			This returns the device to standard matching rules binding.
276			Writing to driver_override does not automatically unbind the
277			device from its current driver or make any attempt to
278			automatically load the specified driver.  If no driver with a
279			matching name is currently loaded in the kernel, the device
280			will not bind to any driver.  This also allows devices to
281			opt-out of driver binding using a driver_override name such as
282			"none".  Only a single driver may be specified in the override,
283			there is no support for parsing delimiters.
284	
285	What:		/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../numa_node
286	Date:		Oct 2014
287	Contact:	Prarit Bhargava <prarit@redhat.com>
288	Description:
289			This file contains the NUMA node to which the PCI device is
290			attached, or -1 if the node is unknown.  The initial value
291			comes from an ACPI _PXM method or a similar firmware
292			source.  If that is missing or incorrect, this file can be
293			written to override the node.  In that case, please report
294			a firmware bug to the system vendor.  Writing to this file
295			taints the kernel with TAINT_FIRMWARE_WORKAROUND, which
296			reduces the supportability of your system.
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